The Calligraph

There is one thing i can do forever, it's - calligraphy

explodingrocks:

Iron Dragon Jizai (fully articulated) Okimono. By Myochin Kiyoharu, Edo Period, 18th/19th century.

Realistically rendered with a long serpentine and undulating body, forged with numerous hammered scales joined inside the body with karakuri tsunagi, the spines finely crafted, the leg joints, head, mouth and ears each constructed of moving parts, its tail clutching the hilt of a gold Shinto sword; signed beneath one foreleg Kiyoharu.
An exquisite example of a jizai okimono, this small but perfectly formed naturalistically-rendered dragon can move its body remarkably smoothly; the limbs and claws are also freely movable and the head and legs turn 180 degrees; it is therefore able to imitate the movements of their real-life counterparts.

(Source: bonhams.com, via thekimonogallery)

blackpaint20:

Painting, hanging scroll. Skeletons dancing; one skeleton seated and playing shamisen beneath broken paper; other skeletons, some with bamboo swords at their sides, others with towels bound around their foreheads, enjoying music and dancing. Ink and colours on silk. Signed and sealed.
Painted on silk by Kawanabe Kyosai 
Meiji Era
1871-1889
Source; British Museum

blackpaint20:

Painting, hanging scroll. Skeletons dancing; one skeleton seated and playing shamisen beneath broken paper; other skeletons, some with bamboo swords at their sides, others with towels bound around their foreheads, enjoying music and dancing. Ink and colours on silk. Signed and sealed.

Painted on silk by Kawanabe Kyosai 

Meiji Era

1871-1889

Source; British Museum

(via panzertron)